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Tag: Statins

The Economic Burden of Cardiovascular Disease

Despite the extensive literature and research that indicates the preventability of cardiovascular disease, it remains a primary and leading cause of not only mortality & morbidity, but also a tremendous health care cost and economic burden. A Vital Signs report recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cited that in 2016 alone, myocardial infarction, strokes, heart failure, and other largely preventable cardiovascular conditions caused 2.2 million hospitalizations, 415,000 deaths, and $32.7 billion in costs.

The researchers that conducted the findings estimated that “without preventative interventions, approximately 16.3 million events and $173.7 billion in hospitalization costs could occur during 2017–2021.” Moreover, a second Vital Signs report pulled data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, and the National Health Interview Survey to assess and analyze the pervasiveness and prevalence of critical, key cardiovascular disease risk factors. Researchers found that 54 million adults are smokers, and could likely benefit from smoking cessation interventions. 71 million adults are not engaging in physical activity, and thus more prone to cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, millions of adults are not taking aspirin as recommended; 39 million adults are not managing their cardiovascular disease risk through suggested statin use; and 40 million adults are living with uncontrolled hypertension.

Quoted in an article published in the American College of Cardiology, Janet S. Wright, MD, FACC—executive director of Million Hearts, a national initiative co-led by the CDC and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, initially designed as a preventive measure to combat one million heart attacks and strokes by the year 2022—”Small changes–the right changes, sustained over time–can produce huge improvements in cardiovascular health.”
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Stopping Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Could be Deadly

A new study confirms that stopping a cholesterol-lowering drug can be critically dangerous. Researchers found that people who stopped taking statins, after reporting a side effect, were 13% more likely to die, or have a hear attack or stroke over the next four years.

Statins work by inhibiting the liver’s ability to produce cholesterol, while simultaneously helping the organ remove existing fats in the blood. These drugs are ‘almost universally prescribed’ to people with cardiovascular disease; moreover, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends the drugs to people ages 40-75, who have no history of heart disease, if they have one or more risk factors.

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