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CMHC PULSE

Cardio Metabolic Health Congress – Official Blog

Lixisenatide Proves Safety in ELIXA While Liraglutide Shows Greater HbA1c Reduction Compared with SGLT-2 Inhibitors

CV outcomes data from the ELIXA trial have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine for the as-yet FDA unapproved GLP-1 agonist lixisenatide, and have shown no increase or decrease in the rate of major cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Read more here.

Meanwhile, findings from a recent meta-analysis have shown that among people with type 2 diabetes the GLP-1 agonist liraglutide provided greater HbA1c reductions compared with SGLT-2 inhibitors. Comprising the meta-analysis were 17 randomized controlled trials that included patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin alone or in combination with sulfonylurea, DPP-4 inhibitors, or thiazolidinedione. Liraglutide was also associated with an improved likelihood of achieving glycemic goals compared with SGLT-2 inhibitors. Read more from a press release on the meta-analysis here.

References:
Pfeffer MA et al. Lixisenatide in patients with type 2 diabetes and acute coronary syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2015;373:2247-2257.

Lorenzi M et al. Liraglutide vs SGLT-2 inhibitors in people with type 2 diabetes: a network meta-analysis. Presented at 23rd World Diabetes Congress, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 30 November – 4 December 2015. Abstract number 0226-P.

Lack of Sleep Reduces Insulin Sensitivity, May Increase Risk of Diabetes

Results of a recent study co-authored by CMHC Chair Robert Eckel, MD, showed that a lack of adequate sleep in healthy study participants led to a reduction in insulin sensitivity of approximately 20%, which may increase their risk of developing diabetes over time. Further, eating during the biological night may alter the way the body responds to the food and impairing insulin sensitivity. Although increasing sleep from 5 hours per night to 9 hours per night for 3 days restored oral insulin sensitivity, the same increase in sleep for 5 days was insufficient to restore intravenous insulin sensitivity. “We did a study last year showing weight gain is caused by a lack of sleep and now we find that there could also be a risk of diabetes,” Dr. Eckel said. “While the exact mechanisms are unknown, it’s clear that a lack of sleep causes metabolic stress.”

Read perspective on the study here and the full study here.

Eckel et al. Morning circadian misalignment during short sleep duration impacts insulin sensitivity. Current Biology. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.011.