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CMHC PULSE

Cardio Metabolic Health Congress – Official Blog

Including Walnuts in Daily Diet Improves Health in Adults at Risk for Diabetes

Researchers randomized 112 participants, 31 men and 81 women, ranging in age from 25 to 75 years with multiple risk factors for diabetes (overweight, high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol, or excess fat around the midsection) to follow a reduced calorie diet with or without nutrition counseling. Within these groups, half were randomly assigned to add walnuts to their daily diet (about 2 ounces/day) for 6 months. After a 3-month break, researchers then switched the groups. Participants were assessed for diet quality, body composition, and cardiac risk measures.

Study results showed that walnuts, with or without nutrition counseling, significantly improved diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010. Endothelial function and total and LDL-C significantly improved from baseline; other factors such as BMI, percent body fat, visceral fat, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and blood pressure, did not change significantly.

Read the full study here.

References:
Njike V et al. Walnut ingestion in adults at risk for diabetes: effects of body composition, diet quality, and cardiac risk measures. BMJ Open Diab Res Care. 2015;3:e000115 doi:10.1136/bmjdrc-2015-000115.

New “Fingerprint” of Inflammation Identified in Obesity-Associated T2DM

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine have identified a new “fingerprint” of inflammation that may be able to predict which patients with obesity may also develop type 2 diabetes. Specifically, inflammatory proteins known as Th17 cells, which are associated with autoimmune conditions, were identified as major contributors to inflammation and hyperglycemia. Although research has already shown inflammation promotes obesity-related type 2 diabetes and related complications, anti-inflammatory drugs have had limited success in treatment. Thus, the findings may provide better insight into the relationship between inflammation and obesity-related type 2 diabetes.

Read more on the study published in the journal Obesity  here.