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Category: CVD Prevention

Risks of Poor Medication Adherence

A recent study published in the journal Diabetes Care indicates that poor medication adherence in adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is strongly associated with increased risks for “cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and hospitalizations.” Conversely, when patients have good medication adherence, these risks are reduced.

The Leicester Diabetes Center at Leicester General Hospital, in conjunction with the Diabetes Research Centre at the University of Leicester in Southmead, United Kingdom, conducted a meta-analysis surrounding eight observational studies in order to determine the correlation between medication adherence and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)—in addition to hospitalization and mortality rates—among adults with type 2 diabetes.

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Stopping Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Could be Deadly

A new study confirms that stopping a cholesterol-lowering drug can be critically dangerous. Researchers found that people who stopped taking statins, after reporting a side effect, were 13% more likely to die, or have a hear attack or stroke over the next four years.

Statins work by inhibiting the liver’s ability to produce cholesterol, while simultaneously helping the organ remove existing fats in the blood. These drugs are ‘almost universally prescribed’ to people with cardiovascular disease; moreover, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends the drugs to people ages 40-75, who have no history of heart disease, if they have one or more risk factors.

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