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Category: Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)

5 Cardiometabolic Health Topics You Can’t Miss at CMHC West 2019

With dozens of recently released revised clinical guidelines, breakthrough trial data, and newly approved drugs on the market, it is increasingly important for clinicians leading the fight against cardiometabolic disease to review the latest topics and industry developments. Explore how the most respected leaders of the industry are advancing cardiometabolic health and combating the growing epidemic of cardiovascular diseases through sessions spotlighting the most recent and relevant research.

Cardiovascular Disease
The American Heart Association estimates that someone dies of cardiovascular disease every 38 seconds, leaving CVD as the leading cause of death in the United States. Recent advances in cardiovascular medicine continue to address the problem, with greater usage of direct oral anticoagulants, new paradigms in mitral valve regurgitation management and a larger emphasis on technological devices playing a leading role in the ongoing battle against CVD.

New research reveals a correlation between diabetes and increased risk of cardiovascular and thrombotic adverse events in patients with CAD, PAD, and AF, suggesting that current antithrombotic strategies may need to be reevaluated. Learn more at the Antithrombotics in Diabetic Patients: Recent Clinical Trial Results session chaired by Deepak L. Bhatt, MD.

Obesity Management
In 2019, obesity stands as the second most prevalent CVD risk factor in the United States. The alarming rise in worldwide obesity paralleled with the increased incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus suggests the need for impactful obesity management in the population.

As awareness of obesity complications grows, the focus turns to obesity management techniques such as tailoring nutritional plans specific to patients and their needs. Recent research on the benefits of bariatric surgery for cardiometabolic patients and its long-term effects will be presented alongside developments in pharmacotherapy for obese patients and lifestyle medicine. Learn more from world-renowned experts Dr. Robert E. Ratner and Dr. Ken Fujioka at Session I: Obesity and Lifestyle Medicine .

Heart Failure
The incidence of heart failure is the only form of heart disease that hasn’t decreased in over 30 years, with approximately 550,000 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. per year.  Technological advancements in cardiac devices and improved prevention and treatment methods have diminished the death rate, but cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the country. A growing need to identify the underlying metabolic causes of heart failure prompts new studies aimed at developing new therapies for patients and addressing the problem at its earliest stage.

Recent research points to the need for comprehensive therapeutic strategies targeting heart failure and type 2 diabetes to improve overall patient outcomes. Studies have revealed that antihyperglycemic therapy can prevent heart failure in patients with and without type 2 diabetes and can be used as a tool for optimizing HF patient care. Learn more about the connection between heart failure and diabetes, the latest advances in iron repletion therapy, and the most recent, relevant clinical research at Session III: Heart Failure and Hypertension .

Female Cardiometabolic Care
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women, outnumbering deaths from all other causes combined. According to the American Heart Association, one in three women have some form of cardiovascular disease and recognizing women at risk of CVD is of tremendous public health importance. Studies have shown that under-recognition of heart disease in female patients is frequent and often leads to less aggressive treatment strategies and poorer outcomes. Comprehensive education, training,and awareness are necessary to ensure adequate future female cardiometabolic care.

Back by popular demand, the CMHC West Women’s Health Summit will cover an array of topics ranging from the intersection between breast cancer and CVD, to cardiometabolic risk in American Indians, Alaska native women, pregnancy and PCOS patients. The one-day workshop spearheaded by Dr. Pamela Morris, expert on female cardiovascular risk, will present an in-depth analysis of the intricacies related to female cardiometabolic care and the newest developments in prevention and management therapy. Explore the Women’s Health Summit agenda, the can’t-miss event in women’s healthcare of the year.

Diabetes Management
According to recent calculations, the CDC reports 100 million U.S. adults to be living with diabetes or prediabetes, with that number expected to rise to 592 million by 2035.
Only about 20% of diabetic individuals are under professional care, according to BioMed Central. A recent study on the future implications of diabetes projects that the condition will remain a major health crisis in America despite medical advances and prevention efforts.

Crucial to the control of this epidemic is successful diabetes management based on the most recent research and trial results. Adherence to new glycemic target guidelines, medication and treatment plans and the impact of real-world data on the treatment of patients with T2DM will be discussed in depth by expert faculty with decades of experience in diabetic care. Learn more about the newest developments in diabetic therapies, prevention, and management at Session IV: Diabetes Management.

CMHC West 2019: Advancing Cardiometabolic Health from East to West
The CMHC West conference allows attendees the opportunity to delve into three days of comprehensive clinical education, covering the key topics below, led by world-renowned faculty, clinicians and keynote speakers and guaranteed to leave attendees with the most up-to-date, applicable knowledge to incorporate into their practice.

You can still gain access to the latest clinical education and a panel of world-renowned speakers by signing up today for our can’t miss event in cardiometabolic health education.

Register Now 

New Metabolic Target to Prevent Heart Failure Identified

The incidence of heart failure is the only form of heart disease that has not decreased in over 30 years, with approximately 550,000 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. per year.  Technological advancements in cardiac devices and improved prevention and treatment methods have diminished the death rate, but cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the country. A growing need to identify the underlying metabolic causes of heart failure has prompted new studies aimed at developing new therapies for patients and addressing the problem at its earliest stage.

A recent study from researchers at Ohio State University identifies a cardiometabolic process that could prevent and treat heart failure. Led by Dr. Doug Lewandowski, the research team discovered potentially detrimental changes in the heart’s metabolism that occur as a result of chronic stress, long before any physical signs or symptoms of heart failure are present. These first maladaptive changes occur in cardiac cell metabolism as the heart adapts to increased demands; addressing them early could prevent or slow the progression of heart failure.

Lewandowski’s team examined mouse models of heart failure as well as human heart tissue obtained from heart failure patients before and after cardiac assist devices were installed.
The tested mice overexpressed a gene for a protein called ACSL1, known to produce the reactive fat compound acyl-CoA. Upon exposure to conditions that cause heart failure, the mice maintained normal production of acyl-CoA, reducing and/or delaying the extent of heart failure. By maintaining acyl-CoA levels, the hearts were able to maintain the ability to metabolize fat and generate energy. Researchers also found that overexpression of ACSL1 reduces toxic fats, normalizes cell function and reduces the progressive loss of cardiovascular function in mice.

In examining heart failure patients, Lewandowski’s team found that the amount of the reactive fat compound was nearly 60% lower than in those with normal hearts. The decreased levels of acyl-CoA reveal a disruption in the hearts metabolic process, resulting in the creation of toxic fats and cardiac functioning impairment. Failing human hearts with the help of left ventricular assist devices behaved similarly to those of mice, restoring acyl-CoA levels to normal once not overworked.

The recent findings reveal an important relationship between fat metabolism in the heart and its inability to function. Although more research is needed, the team at Ohio State believes that targeting the normalization of acyl-CoA levels has the potential to become an effective method of preventing and treating heart failure. Future cardiometabolic care may include gene and drug therapy, and even dietary modifications aimed at stabilizing acyl-CoA compounds. With the help of advanced imaging, Lewandowski and his team hope to soon track fat metabolism and heart function in greater depth. Further studies will explore how the normalization of acyl-CoA reduces toxic fats and increases protective fats in order to understand how these improvements are achieved, and whether they can be replicated through supplementation with fats, medications, and other compounds.