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Tag: T2DM

Follow-Up of EDICT Study Demonstrates Long-Term Efficacy of Initial Combination Therapy in T2DM Management

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects approximately 28 million people in the United States and is characterized by hyperglycemia due to insulin resistance and impaired β-cell function. Its prevalence has almost doubled in the last two decades and diabetes costs the economy $245 billion annually; with most of these costs attributed to T2DM. The rapid increase in both the prevalence and associated healthcare costs underscores the need for optimizing treatment, as several pharmacological agents for T2DM are currently approved, with many more in development. Due to the progressive nature of T2DM, early initiation of combination therapy has been proposed as an approach to achieve better preservation of β-cell function.

The Efficacy and Durability of Initial Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes (EDICT) study was a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of initial triple combination therapy (metformin/pioglitazone/exenatide) compared to a conventional sequential therapy (metformin, followed by sequential add-on therapy of a sulfonylurea and basal insulin) in achieving glycemic control in T2DM patients. The original results from the EDICT study, published in 2015, demonstrated that early combination therapy in recently-diagnosed (<2 years) patients led to a greater reduction in HbA1c levels compared to conventional therapy, including a 1.2 kg mean weight loss (as compared to a 4.1 kg weight gain with conventional therapy) during a follow-up time of 24 months.1 A 6-year follow-up of this study was recently presented at the 2018 American Diabetes Association in Orlando, FL. In this follow-up, subjects that received initial triple therapy experienced significantly greater reductions in HbA1c compared to conventional therapy (mean HbA1c of 5.8% vs. 6.7%, p<0.001), with more patients achieving target HbA1c levels (<6.5%) in the triple therapy group (52%) compared to conventional therapy (25%).2 In addition, patients on initial triple therapy had improved β-cell function, less episodes of hypoglycemia, and weight loss. Progression of carotid intima media thickness, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis, was also reduced by 50% in patients receiving triple therapy.2

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Inflammation and risk of T2DM: Insights from the CANTOS trial

Data from several studies have suggested that persistent low-grade inflammation has an important role in the pathophysiology of many cardiometabolic conditions. Inflammatory markers, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events, as well as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Canakinumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets interleukin-1 (IL-1), which is upstream of IL-6 and hs-CRP, thereby decreasing IL-1 signaling and consequent inflammation. Last year, the authors of the CANTOS trial demonstrated that treatment with canakinumab led to the reduction of cardiovascular events independent of lipid levels in patients with prior myocardial infarction and high levels of hs-CRP (≥2 mg/L). The results of this landmark trial served as important proof-of-concept to support the inflammation hypothesis in the pathophysiology of atherothrombosis.

Because inflammation has been shown to play a role in insulin resistance, defective insulin secretion, and the development of type 2 diabetes in pre-clinical experiments and observational studies, authors of the CANTOS trial also tested the hypothesis that canakinumab treatment reduces the risk of incident type 2 diabetes (T2D). A key secondary endpoint of the CANTOS trial was to assess the effect of canakinumab in reducing the progression of prediabetes to diabetes by measuring the rates of new-onset T2D in prediabetic patients. To do so, the trial enrolled a total of 10,061 patients, out of which 4,057 (40.3%) had baseline diabetes, 4,960 (49.3%) had pre-diabetes, and 1,044 (10.4%) were normoglycemic. Results from this highly anticipated study were recently published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology by Everett and colleagues.

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