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Tag: obesity epidemic

Adolescent & Childhood Obesity Reaches All-Time High

The number of obese children and adolescents rose to 124 million in 2016: more than 10 times higher than the 11 million classified as obese 40 years ago, in 1975. A further 213 million children and adolescents were overweight in 2016, finds a new study published Tuesday in the Lancet.

Looking at the broader picture, this equated to roughly 5.6% of girls and 7.8% of boys being obese last year. Most countries within the Pacific Islands, including the Cook Islands and Nauru, had the highest rates globally, with more than 30% of their youth ages 5 to 19 estimated to be obese.

The United States and some countries in the Caribbean, such as Puerto Rico, as well as the Middle East, including Kuwait and Qatar, came next with levels of obesity above 20% for the same age group, according to the new data, visualized by the NCD Risk Factor Collaboration.

“Over the past four decades, obesity rates in children and adolescents have soared globally, and continue to do so in low- and middle-income countries,” said Majid Ezzati, professor of global environmental health at Imperial College London in the UK, who led the research. “More recently, they have plateaued in higher-income countries, although obesity levels remain unacceptably high,” he said.

Over the same time period, the rise in obesity has particularly accelerated in East and South Asia. “We now have children who are gaining weight when they are 5 years old,” unlike children at the same age two generations ago, Ezzati told CNN.

In the largest study of its kind, more than 1,000 researchers collaborated to analyze weight and height data for almost 130 million people, including more than 31 million people 5 to 19 years old, to identify obesity trends from 1975 to 2016.

“Rates of child and adolescent obesity are accelerating in East, South and Southeast Asia, and continue to increase in other low and middle-income regions,” said James Bentham, a statistician at the University of Kent, who co-authored the paper.

Obesity in adults is defined using a person’s body mass index, the ratio between weight and height. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is classified as a healthy weight, 25 to 29.9 considered overweight and 30 and over obese. Cut-offs are lower among children and adolescents and vary based on age.

“While average BMI among children and adolescents has recently plateaued in Europe and North America, this is not an excuse for complacency as more than one in five young people in the U,S. and one in 10 in the UK are obese,” he said.

Being obese as a child comes with a high likelihood of being obese as an adult and the many health consequences that come with it, including the increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. The potential for these chronic conditions into adulthood also puts an increased burden on health systems — and financial constraints on individuals.

“We are seeing very worrying trends with pediatricians who have children come in as young as 7 with type 2 diabetes,” said Temo Waqanivalu, programme officer for population-based prevention of non-communicable diseases at the World Health Organization. WHO co-led the research with Imperial College London.

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How Healthy is YOUR Town?

Health
Exercise has received a lot more stage time in the recent years, especially due to the enormous focus on nutrition and the current obesity epidemic in our country.

We may personally feel like more gyms are packed and the lines are longer at grocery stores selling organic foods. It is no lie that people are more conscious of diet and staying active.

But is this just where YOU live?

An interesting article surfaced in the New York Daily News which covered exercise based on region; specifically cities in the US. A 2015-2016 Gallup and Sharecare poll showed that across 189 cities in the U.S., a person’s exercise frequency had nothing to do with where they lived.

While we would most likely agree that out of the 350,000 people polled, the ones living in metropolitan areas would be more likely to exercise a lot more, this poll proved us all wrong!

At least we were right about our earlier points:

  1. The poll showed that regions with higher rates of regular exercise also had less chronic health issues like heart attack, diabetes, obesity, and depression. Exercise = less disease, less obesity, better health.
  2. 53% of Americans were classified as “regular exercisers” in 2016. This was the highest rate on record since the same company ran the first U.S. poll in 2008. So we are on the right track!

The cities with the higher volume of exercisers are argued to have made routine exercise MORE possible for their citizens than other cities. Wouldn’t you be more likely to exercise if your city had more safe, livable, bike-able, run-able and walkable spaces accessible to you?

Now we know you are curious…who won? Who lost?

Boulder, Colorado (population of 108,000 approximately) had the highest percentage of regular exercising citizens. These people exercise three or more days a week, for at least 30 minutes a day.

NYC was almost at the end of the list (167 out of 189) and as far as who lost: Hickory, N.C. with 42%!

Are you wondering about your city? U.S. Cities ranked by Exercise Rate

New York Daily News. The surprising cities with the highest and lowest rates of exercise.
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/surprising-cities-highest-lowest-rates-exercise-article-1.3509233.
September 20, 2017. Accessed October 5, 2017.
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