A study of close to 500,000 people without cardiovascular disease at baseline showed that total physical activity related to work, recreation, or utilitarian needs such as walking to do errands was associated with a lower short-term risk of developing CVD. The researchers found that there is a “clearly positive . . . dose-response relationship between levels of total activity and risks of major CVD,” senior author Dr Zhengming Chen (University of Oxford, UK) told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology.

Lead author Dr Derrick A Bennet (Oxford University) and colleagues analyzed data from adults who participated in the China Kadoorie Biobank study, and their findings were published November 8, 2017 in JAMA Cardiology.
Compared with people in high-income countries, these participants in middle-income China had a much higher average level of physical activity: 21.5 metabolic equivalents of task (MET) hours/day, which equals 5 hours of cycling or brisk walking a day.

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