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Tag: exercise

Trick-Or-Jump

A recent article[1] revealed what happens if you frequently visit your office’s Halloween candy stash, or you eat your kid’s leftover Trick-Or-Treat candies…

Jumping Jacks. 

Lots and lots of them, if you want to burn off what you ate! Although Halloween candies often come in smaller, “mini” versions of the regular candy sizes, they are all still packed with calories and sugar.

The article provided this handy but SCARY chart* (how appropriate for Halloween), which shows us just how many minutes of jumping jacks you need to do in order to fight off the evil Halloween candy you consume…

*Calculations based on a 150-pound woman

[1] Popsugar. Sugar, Jenny. “This Is How May Jumping Jacks You Need to Do to Work Off Halloween Candy.” https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/How-Burn-Off-Halloween-Candy-42393489?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=popsugar.com. October 29, 2017. Accessed October 30, 2017.

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How Healthy is YOUR Town?

Health
Exercise has received a lot more stage time in the recent years, especially due to the enormous focus on nutrition and the current obesity epidemic in our country.

We may personally feel like more gyms are packed and the lines are longer at grocery stores selling organic foods. It is no lie that people are more conscious of diet and staying active.

But is this just where YOU live?

An interesting article surfaced in the New York Daily News which covered exercise based on region; specifically cities in the US. A 2015-2016 Gallup and Sharecare poll showed that across 189 cities in the U.S., a person’s exercise frequency had nothing to do with where they lived.

While we would most likely agree that out of the 350,000 people polled, the ones living in metropolitan areas would be more likely to exercise a lot more, this poll proved us all wrong!

At least we were right about our earlier points:

  1. The poll showed that regions with higher rates of regular exercise also had less chronic health issues like heart attack, diabetes, obesity, and depression. Exercise = less disease, less obesity, better health.
  2. 53% of Americans were classified as “regular exercisers” in 2016. This was the highest rate on record since the same company ran the first U.S. poll in 2008. So we are on the right track!

The cities with the higher volume of exercisers are argued to have made routine exercise MORE possible for their citizens than other cities. Wouldn’t you be more likely to exercise if your city had more safe, livable, bike-able, run-able and walkable spaces accessible to you?

Now we know you are curious…who won? Who lost?

Boulder, Colorado (population of 108,000 approximately) had the highest percentage of regular exercising citizens. These people exercise three or more days a week, for at least 30 minutes a day.

NYC was almost at the end of the list (167 out of 189) and as far as who lost: Hickory, N.C. with 42%!

Are you wondering about your city? U.S. Cities ranked by Exercise Rate

New York Daily News. The surprising cities with the highest and lowest rates of exercise.
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/surprising-cities-highest-lowest-rates-exercise-article-1.3509233.
September 20, 2017. Accessed October 5, 2017.
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Sitting at Work? Exercise to Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk

Regular exercise outside of work can reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome in people whose jobs have them sitting most of the time, according to a small study from Brazil.

“If you have a sedentary occupation, especially in a sitting position for hours, you should move yourself out of work at least 150 minutes per week in a moderate intensity to mitigate the detrimental effects of sedentary behavior at work,” Eduardo Caldas Costa from Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte in Natal reported.

Sedentary behavior has been associated with an increased risk for metabolic syndrome – a cluster of unfavorable markers including abdominal obesity, high blood pressure and low HDL “good” cholesterol – which, in turn, is associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

The researchers investigated whether Navy workers who spent about eight hours daily seated, mostly in administrative duties, had different risks for metabolic syndrome based on their activity levels outside of work.

All the workers were men, ranging in age from 26 to 42. Out of 502 workers included in the final analysis, 201, or 40 percent, did not achieve at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-vigorous activity. Nearly half, 48 percent, were overweight and almost 19 percent were obese.

After adjusting for age, time in the job, body mass index (BMI) and tobacco use, researchers found the sedentary workers who met the physical activity recommendations were only about half as likely to have metabolic syndrome, compared to those with lower activity levels.

Workers with higher activity levels were also less likely to have abdominal obesity, high blood pressure and low HDL.

Even those who increased their activity slightly (the “insufficiently active” group) had lower blood pressure than workers who remained sedentary off the job, researchers reported in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Sedentary occupation workers should break up prolonged sitting time at work as much as they can in order to reduce the risk for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases,” Caldas Costa said by email. “Be involved in regular physical activity out of work, including leisure time, domestic activities, and active transportation (i.e., walking and/or cycling).”

Only the physically active group, he added, and not the insufficiently active group, had a reduced risk for metabolic syndrome compared to the sedentary group. “Therefore,” he said, “it seems that probably there is a minimum quantity of physical activity that can mitigate the detrimental effects of sedentary behavior at work.”

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1/3 of World = Overweight

A new study reports that more than two billion adults and children across the globe are overweight or obese, and suffer from related health problems. Spurred by poor nutrition and low levels of physical activity, this number equates to one-third of the world’s population.

While 2.2 billion people can be classified as overweight or obese, more than 710 million are obese: 5% of all children, and 12% of all adults, can be categorized in this segment. The United States has the greatest percentage of obese or overweight children and young adults, at 13%.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, states that a growing number of people across the globe are dying from poor health, and problems linked to being overweight. “People who shrug off weight gain do so at their own risk–risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and other life-threatening conditions,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and evaluation at the University of Washington, who worked on the study.

Researchers analyzed data collected between 1980 and 2015 from 68.5 billion people, and revealed that the number of people affected by obesity has doubled since 1980 in 73 countries, and continued to rise across most other countries in the analysis. Although the percentages of obese children were lower than adults, that rate at which their numbers have increased was greater–indicating greater future risk if nothing is done to alleviate and curb the growing problem.

“This raises the alarm that we may be facing a wave of obesity in the coming years across high and low income countries,” states Goodarz Danaei, assistant professor of global health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Because obesity levels have risen in all countries, irrespective of income levels, the issue does not simply boil down to wealth. The paper reads: “Changes in the food environment and food systems are probably major drivers.”

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The Benefits of Bicycling

A recent study at the University of Glasgow, published in the British Medical Journal, indicates that those people who bicycle to work are 41 percent less likely to develop heart disease and cancer. While walking has clearly outlined benefits, it does not provide the same payback as bicycling.

The test was conducted with 264,337 people; compared to driving, cycling is linked to a 46 percent lower risk of cardiovascular disease. The same study demonstrated that walking reduced heart disease by 27 percent, but showed no links between lower risks of cancer or premature death.

Researchers and experts believe that the high health benefits of cycling may be linked to the fact that cyclists often travel longer distances, and exercise at higher intensities.

Dr. Jason Gill, a professor and scientist who helped execute the study, believes that the government should legislate easier ways for people to commute by bike, including the creation of “cycle lanes, city bike hire, subsidized cycle purchase schemes, and increasing provision for cycles on public transport.” These efforts have the potential to create significant opportunities for improvement of public health.

Perhaps most importantly, it is imperative to make physical activity both ‘easier and more accessible.’ Workplaces, local authorities, and the legislature should investigate ways to increase and enhance public transport—making it an ‘easy option’ to get to work.

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Move — and Move Often!

While most physicians and nutritionists agree that low to moderate levels of weekly physical activity is often insufficient to significantly reduce body weight, studies indicate that those who transition from little to no daily physical activity to moderate levels have clinically meaningful reductions in cardiometabolic risk.

Scores of controlled trials over the last decade demonstrate that physical activity helps mitigate and reduce cardiometabolic risk via biologic mechanisms, which are not entirely dependent upon body weight or BMI reduction. Research increasingly supports that those who have prediabetes should consistently increase physical activity levels, despite little to no weight loss.

According to research published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, the benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of being overweight and/or obese in middle-aged and elderly people. The observational study, conducted with a sample size of over 5,000 people aged 55 years and older, followed up with participants for 15 years. While overweightness and obesity is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, and weight loss is recommended, it is slightly different with the elderly population: weight loss, especially unintentional, is often associated with muscle loss and death.

Regardless of age, physical activity is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Studies have further demonstrated that physical activity is protective for cardiovascular risk, playing a crucial role in the health of middle-aged and elderly people. Without adequate physical activity, those who are overweight and obese are at a significantly higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

The harmful effects of overweightness and obesity occur through adipose tissue, which accelerates the atherosclerotic process, thereby increasing cardiovascular risk. Exercise and physical activity lowers the harmful effects of atherosclerosis by reducing the stabilization of plagues on blood vessels, ultimately reducing the heart’s oxygen demand. Engaging in high levels of physical activity protects people from the harmful effects of adipose tissue on cardiovascular disease. The idea: move—and move often!

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