0

CMHC PULSE

Cardio Metabolic Health Congress – Official Blog

Coronary Artery Calcium as a Predictor of ASCVD Risk

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death in the US, and prevention of ASCVD is a public health priority in order to minimize its impacts on morbidity and mortality. Global CVD risk assessment is an integrated approach to evaluate the total risk of developing CVD over a given period (usually 10 years) based on several risk factors, including age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking, family history, overweight and obesity. These risk factors have been incorporated in several algorithms for the primary prevention of CVD, including the Pooled Cohort Equation (PCE) developed by American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA). However, despite the development of several algorithms for risk assessments aimed to prevent CVD events, the overall disease burden has increased. CVD events can occur even in individuals that do not have risk factors, and the dependence of CVD risk assessment on the presence or absence of conventional risk factors may not allow for accurate risk prediction, given the fact that CVD is multi-factorial and progresses in a continuum.

As a result, novel risk assessment methods, including coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, may be necessary to improve ASCVD risk prediction and to better guide treatment options. The utility of the CAC score in preventing CVD risk in asymptomatic individuals has been demonstrated in several results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a study designed to evaluate the characteristics of subclinical atherosclerosis and risk factors for ASCVD progression. However, most of the outcomes of these studies have evaluated coronary heart disease (CHD) with short to intermediate follow-ups.

Read more

Meat Proteins Increase Risk of Heart Disease by 60%

A recent study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology has found that eating meat regularly is associated with a 60 percent increase in the risk of heart disease, while plant-based proteins have been found to benefit the heart. Researchers who investigated the effects of different sources of protein on the heart found that people who consume a large amount of meat saw a sharp uptick in the baseline risk of cardiovascular disease; conversely, eating protein from sources like nuts and seeds was linked to a 40 percent reduction in CVD.

Scientists analyzed data from over 81,000 participants of the Adventist Health Study, all of whom filled out questionnaire regrading their eating patterns between 2002 and 2007. The authors stated that the link between heart disease and diet was most apparent before participants reached old age, leading them to believe that choosing healthy protein sources is an important factor in preventing avoidable deaths. “Our results suggest that healthy choices can be advocated based on protein sources, specifically preferring diets low in meat intake and with a higher intake of plant proteins from nuts and seeds,” the authors wrote.

Read more