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Category: Diabetes

Overtime Work in Women = Overdrive Diabetes

Working overtime may help your paycheck and give you a leg up in the office, but a new study suggests that women who log too many hours may have an increased risk of diabetes. Researchers in Canada found that woman who worked overtime increased their risk of diabetes, with published findings in Monday’s British Medical Journal Diabetes Research and Care.

Using medical records, researchers looked at the risk of developing diabetes in over 7,000 men and women ages 35 to 74 who were working different numbers of weekly hours. They found that one out of 10 people in the study developed diabetes, in particular, if they were men, older, and obese. Although women generally were less likely to get diabetes than men, here’s the interesting part: Women who worked overtime, or over 45 hours per week, were 62 percent more likely to get diabetes over those women who worked regular hours.

This is especially surprising given that the risk actually decreased in men working long hours. “The difference in paid and unpaid hours for men and women are probably why,” said Dr. Mahée Gilbert-Ouimet, the lead researcher on the study. “Women tend to do twice as much unpaid work, like household chores and other family duties.” All of that may contribute to increases in stress hormones, which affect blood sugar control.

If you cannot afford to work fewer hours to meet the traditional 40 hour work week, there are other steps that can be taken to lower risk. Researchers stressed that talking to your doctor about more frequent diabetes screenings, and increasing good habits that help maintain overall good health (such as exercising, not smoking, moderate use of alcohol, getting restful sleep, and healthy eating), are good places to start.

Women should also recognize that it is important and necessary to ask for help with other activities not done at work, including household and family responsibilities, if they are the primary caregivers.

SOURCES
https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Wellness/overtime-work-overdrive-diabetes-risk-women/story?id=56327956
https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/02/health/diabetes-long-hours-women-study/index.html

Finding Common Ground for Glycated Haemoglobin Test Targets

In March of this year, the American College of Physicians (ACP) issued a guidance statement on HbA1c targets for adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), which have been the subject of debates and discussions in the medical community. At the center of this debate is ACP’s recommendation for a target HbA1c goal between 7-8% to maintain optimal glucose control, which is higher than what’s recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) or the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and American College of Endocrinology (ACE).

ADA recommends a goal of <7% for HbA1c, even advocating more stringent goals (such as <6.5%) for certain patients with a low risk of hypoglycemia. The AACE/ACE guidelines recommend keeping glycated hemoglobin levels at ≤ 6.5% for most patients with low-risk of side effects.

The statement from ACP also recommends the individualization of T2D therapy, deintensification of therapy for patients that achieve HbA1c levels of less than 6.5%, and controlling symptoms rather than focusing on specific HbA1c goals in patients with a life expectancy of less than 10 years (such as patients aged 80 or older, that reside in a nursing home, or with chronic conditions – including dementia, cancer, end-stage kidney disease, severe COPD, or congestive heart failure). One of the main ideas behind this statement is to balance the benefits of lowering blood glucose with potential risks, such as important side effects (like hypoglycemia and weight gain), costs, and overall patient burden.

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