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Category: CMHC

Cardiometabolic Health Congress

Higher Risk Factors for Women

Fewer women who suffer a heart attack each year in the UK would die if they were simply given the same treatments as men, according to new research.

Scientists at the University of Leeds and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden used data from Sweden’s extensive online cardiac registry, SWEDEHEART, to analyze the outcomes of 180,368 patients who suffered a heart attack over a 10 year period to December 2013.

After accounting for the expected number of deaths seen in the average population, the researchers found that women had an excess mortality up to three times higher than men’s in the year after having a heart attack.

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Cardiovascular Mortality Rates Vary by Geography

It’s a testament to modern medicine that death rates from heart disease around the nation have been cut in half, yet new research sheds light on the wide disparities in cardiovascular death rates depending on geography. Using death certificate data, a research group led by University of Washington Medical Center cardiologist Dr. Gregory Roth conducted the most comprehensive analysis of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases in history.

Their findings indicated that cardiovascular death rates have been cut in half since 1980, though cardiovascular disease still represents the cause of death in the United States. In 2014, for instance, cardiovascular diseases accounted for more than 846,000 deaths, according to the research, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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