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Month: December 2017

Mental Stress: The Enemy for Women’s Hearts

New research published in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Indicates that mental stress has a greater effect on peripheral vessels in women than in men. The additional constriction of blood vessels seen in women may increase their risk of heart-related events and death.

Stress is a normal part of life and our body has a range of responses designed to help us react accordingly. These include physical, mental and emotional adjustments intended to be a positive reaction to keep us alert and ready to avoid danger. However, with the ever-increasing challenges of life today, some people experience a continuous stress response that can have negative consequences.

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Live Longer By Saying “I Do”

In a new study published last week in the Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers at Emory University in Atlanta found that people with cardiovascular disease who were not married –- including those who were divorced, separated, widowed or never married –- had 24 percent higher rates of death from any cause during the study period, compared to those who were married.

Specifically, not being married was associated with a higher risk of death from cardiovascular causes, like heart attacks and strokes, for the more than 6,000 Emory Healthcare patients in this study. Divorced and separated people had a 41 percent increased risk of death; widowed people had nearly double that risk.

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