While there are a multitude of promises available regarding specific diets that will help individuals lose weight and/or mitigate cardiovascular risks factors, clinical research indicates that within a few weeks of eating a whole-food, plant-based diet, many people will have improved insulin sensitivity and lowered levels of cholesterol.


Dr. Thomas M. Campbell, Medical Director of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and clinical director of the University of Rochester Program for Nutrition Medicine, also refers to the high probability of improved bowel movements, enhanced sleep hygiene and increased energy, and improved skin quality.

Extensive scientific literature and research demonstrates that dietary cholesterol and saturated fat are linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease. Meat and fish have saturated fat, while a vegan diet is devoid of any cholesterol, and low in terms of saturated fat. When people begin to eat a plant-based diet, therefore, their cholesterol levels decline; and ultimately, their risk of cardiovascular disease decreases. This all happens within a few weeks, as blood vessel walls become healthier due to the increase of nitric oxide in arterial walls, which reduces the risk for heart attacks and strokes. Moreover, without heavy saturated fats from animal products, blood is less viscous and begins to pump more easily at lower pressures.

The American Diabetes association confirms that among individuals with type 2 diabetes, those who eat a vegan diet have considerably improved glycemic control, in addition to lessened cardiovascular risk factors. The diet can even reverse the disease altogether, in some patients. According to Dr. Michael Klaper, an internationally-recognized authority on the link between diet and health, “A person with uncontrolled diabetes, on insulin, can see demonstrable improvements in medication usage and efficacy in 24 hours.” Conversely, another study also published by the American Diabetes Association indicates that those who eat high amounts of animal protein are 22 percent more likely to develop diabetes.

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