A recent review of evidence published in the journal Progress in Cardiovascular Disease indicates that runners live three years longer than no-runners, solidifying the hypothesis that longevity can be increased by exercise—to a substantial degree.

The research states that not only does running significantly reduce the risk of heart disease and premature death, but also demonstrates benefits even if other aspects of health are sub-par. Someone who drinks and smokes can still reduce early mortality by running: between 25% and 40%.

Running 5-10 minutes per day was found to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, in addition to death from any and all causes. The review’s authors state that there is no other exercise that yields such a significant impact; statistically, an hour of running will increase one’s life expectancy by seven hours—and prolong life more than other types of exercise including cycling, swimming, or walking.

The authors also confirm that even a jog counts as moderately vigorous exercise. Runners primarily have enhanced levels of aerobic fitness and lower levels of body fat, and enjoy an array of health and wellness benefits. Moreover, in terms of time, it takes 105 minutes of walking to produce the same benefits as a 25-minute run.

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