0

Month: December 2016

Empagliflozin FDA Approved for Prevention of Cardiovascular Death

In an unprecedented move, the US FDA approved the SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin for the prevention of cardiovascular death in patients with type 2 diabetes and coexisting cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Empagliflozin was first approved in 2014 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and later demonstrated cardiovascular risk reduction in the EMPA-REG trial. Specifically, treatment with empagliflozin significantly reduced the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and CV death, as well as death from any cause and hospitalization for heart failure, in more than 7000 adults with type 2 diabetes at high CV risk. Read more

Share onShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Linking Fiber Facts & Heart Health

Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of fiber has significantly lowered levels of cholesterol, reduces the risk of stroke and diabetes, helps with weight loss, and can ultimately prevent cardiovascular disease.

Fiber comes in two forms: soluble and insoluble, though most fiber-rich foods contain both types. While most people generally associate fiber with a healthy digestive system and track, research has shown that its benefits for heart health are significant. Read more

Share onShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

USPSTF Advises Lifestyle Counseling on CVD Prevention, Even for Low-Risk Adults

In its latest draft recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is advising primary care physicians to offer counseling regarding healthy lifestyle habits in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD), even for adults who are at low risk. The recommendation applies to adults who are 18 years of age and older who are not obese, as well as adults without hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, or abnormal blood glucose levels. The recommendation is a result of a review of 88 trials in which the USPSTF found that behavioral counseling provided at least a small benefit for cardiovascular risk reduction. These benefits included improvements in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels, LDL-cholesterol levels, BMI, and waist circumference. They did not find evidence that behavioral counseling resulted in a reduction in mortality or CVD rates.

Methods of behavioral counseling included either print- or Internet-based materials and face-to-face individual or group counseling.

The USPSTF is accepting comments on the draft recommendation through January 2, 2017.

Reference:

USPSTF releases draft recommendation on behavioral counseling for healthy diet, CVD prevention.

Share onShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn