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Month: March 2016

Top-Line Results Show Alirocumab Reduces Frequency and Need for Apheresis in Patients with Heterozygous FH

Top-line results from the phase 3 ODYSSEY ESCAPE trial, which evaluated 62 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) who required chronic, weekly, or biweekly apheresis therapy, have shown that the PCSK9 inhibitor alirocumab reduced the frequency of apheresis by 75% compared with placebo, and eliminated the need for apheresis for 63% of patients in the study.

Alirocumab has been approved since July 2015 in the United States as an adjunct to diet and maximally tolerated statin therapy for the treatment of HeFH or clinical atherosclerotic CVD when additional lowering of LDL cholesterol is required.

Read more on the study here. Detailed data will be presented at future medical conferences.

For perspective from expert faculty on the management of high-risk patients in the PCSK9 era, plan to attend the Best of the CMHC Regional Conference Series taking place in Atlanta, GA on May 7 and in Chicago, IL on June 18, as well as the 11th Annual CMHC in Boston, MA October 5- 8, 2016.

Reference:
Medscape. ODYSSEY ESCAPE top-line results: alirocumab reduces HFH-related apheresis therapy.

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PCSK9 Inhibitors May Benefit Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

Results of a recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicineshowed that patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who were treated with PCSK9 inhibitors benefited not only from LDL-cholesterol reduction but plaque stabilization as well. Currently, the PCSK9 inhibitors evolocumab and alirocumab are approved for lowering of LDL in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease who are not at goal despite maximally tolerated statin therapy.

According to the study authors, acute coronary events result in a dynamic increase of PCSK9 levels that may have an effect on plaque vulnerability of both culprit and nonculprit coronary vessels, thus leading to a potential role for PCSK9 inhibitors in managing ACS. Further, formal study on the timing of PCSK9 inhibitor administration to patients with ACS and their effects on inflammatory and thrombosis pathways will be necessary. For more perspective on the study, read here.

To learn more on managing high-risk patients in the PCSK9 era, don’t miss the Best of the CMHC Regional Conference Series taking place in Atlanta, GA on May 7 and in Chicago, IL on June 18, as well as the 11th Annual CMHC in Boston, MA October 5- 8, 2016.

References:
Navarese EP et al. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 monoclonal antibodies for acute coronary syndrome: a narrative review. Ann Intern Med. Published online 22 March 2016 doi:10.7326/M15-2994.

Healio. PCSK9 inhibitors may be appropriate for use in patients with ACS.

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